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Analysis of the a pet’s blood cells is a very important tool in the diagnosis and monitoring of health problems. A small sample is analyzed so that we can get a better idea of your pet’s overall health. We have an in-house laboratory so we are able to preform the necessary tests and have the results back to you.

Why is early detection bloodwork is needed by your pet?

We record the values that are attained during your pet’s basic lab test as a part of your pet’s annual examination. We can review and analyze your pet’s health record at each exam thereafter, and notice any issues and difference in record points recorded during annual exam. therefore we can treat them sooner before they can become any serious.

How blood samples are collected?

Your veterinarian or a registered veterinary technician can usually collect any needed blood samples during an office visit.

In some cases, however, blood samples need to be drawn at specific times over an extended period. Your pet may need to be kept at the hospital for a few hours or, in certain circumstances, overnight.

What does a blood test look for?

A Complete Blood Count (CBC) :
provides important information about the types and numbers of blood cells in your pet’s blood. A low number of red blood cells, for example, indicates anemia, while a high number of white blood cells can indicate an infection, chronic inflammation, or other disease process.

A Complete Blood Count (CBC) :
provides important information about the types and numbers of blood cells in your pet’s blood. A low number of red blood cells, for example, indicates anemia, while a high number of white blood cells can indicate an infection, chronic inflammation, or other disease process.

A T4:
measures the level of a thyroid hormone and helps to screen for hypothyroidism (low) and hyperthyroidism (too high) diseases. The thyroid gland is in the neck makes a hormone called thyroxine that controls metabolism (the process of turning food into fuel). With hypothyroidism, the gland doesn’t make enough of that hormone.

It’s a common disease in dogs. It affects all breeds, but it is often found in golden retrievers, Doberman pinchers, Irish setters, dachshunds, boxers, and cocker spaniels. It usually happens in middle-aged dogs (ages 4 to 10) of medium to large breeds. Neutered males and spayed females also have a higher risk, but vets are unsure why.

A Blood Chemistry Profile:
particularly important for evaluating organ function (e.g. liver, kidneys), electrolytes, blood sugar, screening for clues that an endocrine disorder may be present, etc. Any abnormalities will help direct your pet’s veterinarian on any further diagnostic tests that may be necessary.

A Lyme Disease Test:
detects another potentially disastrous disease, transmitted by tick. Lyme disease is caused by the corkscrew-shaped bacteria, which is called a spirochete. The bacteria are carried by ticks which transmit the infection when they feed your pets. The disease can cause generalized illness in animals and humans worldwide.